Political and Statistical Account of the British Settlements in the Straits of Malacca; Viz. Pinang, Malacca, and Singapore, with a History of the Mal

Political and Statistical Account of the British Settlements in the Straits of Malacca; Viz. Pinang, Malacca, and Singapore, with a History of the Mal

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...within the Malacca boundary, the hereditary property of Inchi Surin. This man preferred his complaint to government, and in consequence another message was dispatched. The Panghulu's answer set forth a determination to retain the Duson, affirming it to be his own property, and impeaching the right of government to interfere. A proclamation was now published, declaring, that Abdul Syed had forfeited all his claims, and was thenceforth no longer Panghulu of Naning. Such are the principal causes that occasioned, in 1831, the march of a small military force into Naning, whose object it was to reduce the rebellious inhabitants to obedience. It consisted of 150 rank and file of the 29th Madras Native infantry, two six-pounders, and a small detail of Native artillery, under the command of Captain Wyllie, Madras Native infantry. His subalterns were Lieutenant Milnes, Lieutenant Begbie, commanding the artillery, and Ensign Short, with Assistant-surgeon Smith. Mr. Lewis, Assistantresident, accompanied as Commissioner. On the 6th August, the detachment marched, and after a little opposition near Kalama, the frontier of Naning, and at Bukit Sabusah, arrived on the 9th at Mullikey, a village about seventeen miles from Malacca, and about five from Tabu, the residence of the Panghulu, where they encamped. From this place, in consequence of the nonarrival of supplies, the increased resistance offered by the Malays, and the communication with Malacca being threatened, the detachment retreated the following day to Sungie-pattye, where it maintained its position with reinforcements from Malacca, until the 24th August, when orders for its return arrived. After destroying the heavy baggage, the retreat was commenced the same evening. They reached Malacca, after some...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123649556X
  • 9781236495563