Political and Military Episodes in the Latter Half of the Eighteenth Century; Derived from the Life and Correspondence of the Right Hon. John Burgoyne, General, Statesman, Dramatist

Political and Military Episodes in the Latter Half of the Eighteenth Century; Derived from the Life and Correspondence of the Right Hon. John Burgoyne, General, Statesman, Dramatist

List price: US$23.65

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 edition. Excerpt: ...picture of the death of the English General on the Plains of Abraham. horror with which American writers1 entertained the public were for the greater part the creations of vivid imaginations, and the main argument against the employment of Indians in our armies really rested upon their uselessness, and the difficulty of subjecting them to military discipline. Much as Burgoyne, at this time, underrated the enemy he could scarcely have believed that the American troops would be frightened by the war-whoop of the red man; and although their name caused terror to the wives and children of the scattered inhabitants of the backwoods, he might have apprehended that the employment of Indians as skirmishers and scouts at the head of the army would be more likely to have the effect of driving neutrals and waverers into the arms of the enemy for protection, than to tempt them into the British lines. Burgoyne, in his defence, said with truth that in threatening to let loose his Indians " he spoke daggers but used none;" and that he had always looked upon the employment of such allies as " at best a necessary 1 Not only American writers; for in Saunders's News Letter o( 14th August, '77, there appeared a harrowing description of the atrocities committed by Burgoyne's Indians on the banks of Lake Champlain during the advance of the army on Ticonderoga, when, scouring the country conjointly with the English Light Infantry, they scalped 7 men, women and children. What makes this achievement the more remarkable is that, at that time, the country around Lake Champlain was a complete wilderness, and that up to that period of the march no enemy had shown himself. An American writer, whose information was derived from a journal kept by his father, an...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236502353
  • 9781236502353