The Poetical Works of Allan Ramsay; To Which Is Prefixed Memoirs of the Author, a Collection of Soctish Proverbs, and an Improved Glossary, Containing Words Not Explained in Any Former Edition Volume 1

The Poetical Works of Allan Ramsay; To Which Is Prefixed Memoirs of the Author, a Collection of Soctish Proverbs, and an Improved Glossary, Containing Words Not Explained in Any Former Edition Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...name; An' man wi' gaping jaws hae shor'd, Syne like a pagod been ador'd. Ah! friend! replies the ither Lizard, What maks this grumbling in thy gizzard? What cause hae ye to be uneasy? Cannot the sweets o' freedom please ye? We free frae trouble, toil, or care, Enjoy the son, the earth, an' air, The crystal spring an' green-wood shaw, An' beildy holes, when tempests blaw. Why should we fret, look blae, or wan, Tho' we're contemn'd by paughty man? If sae, let's in return be wise, An' that proud animal despise. O fy! returns th' ambitious beast, How weak a fire now warms thy breast! It break's my heart to live sae mean; I'd like t' attract the gazer's een, An' be admir'd--What stately horns The deer's majestic brow adorns! He claims our wonder an' our dread, Where'er he waves his haughty head. What envy a' my spirit fires, When he in clearest pools admires His various beauties wi' delyte, I'm like to drown mysell wi' spite. Thus he held forth--when straight a pack O' hounds, an' hunters at their back, Ran down a deer before their face, Breathless an' wearied wi' the chace; The dogs upon the victim seize, And beugles sound his obsequies: But neither men nor dogs took tent O' our wee Lizards on the bent, While hungry Bawty, Buff, and Tray, Devour'd the paunches o' the prey. Soon as the bluidy deed was past, The Lizard wise the proud addrest: "Dear cousin, now, pray let me hear, How wad ye like to be a deer?" "Oh hon!" quoth he, convinc'd an' wae, "Wha wad hae thought it ance a-day? Weel, be a private life my fate, I'll never envy mair the great: That we are little folk that's true; But sae's our cares an' dangers too.." The Spring and the Sykc. Fed by a living Spring, a rill Flow'd easily a-down a hill: A thousand flowers...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581547
  • 9781236581549