Pluralism

Pluralism : Against the Demand for Consensus

3.5 (8 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

Nicholas Rescher presents a critical reaction against two currently influential tendencies of thought. On the one hand, he rejects the facile relativism that pervades contemporary social and academic life. On the other hand, he opposes the rationalism inherent in new-contractarian theory - both in the idealized communicative-contract version promoted in continental European political philosophy by Jurgen Habermas, and in the idealized social-contract version of the
theory promoted in the Anglo-American context by John Rawls.

Against such tendencies, Professor Rescher's pluralist approach takes a more realistic and pragmatic line, eschewing the convenient recourse of idealization in cognitive and practical matters. Instead of a utopianism that looks to a uniquely perfect order that would prevail under ideal conditions, he advocates incremental improvements within the framework or arrangements that none of us will deem perfect but that all of us 'can live with'. Such an approach replaces the yearning tor an
unattainable consensus with the institution of pragmatic arrangements in which the community will acquiesce - not through agreeing on their optimality, but through a shared recognition among the dissonant parties that the available options are even worse.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 138 x 215 x 13mm | 286g
  • Clarendon Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised ed.
  • line figures, tables
  • 0198236018
  • 9780198236016
  • 2,792,882

Back cover copy

Nicholas Rescher presents a critical reaction against two currently influential tendencies of thought. On the one hand, he rejects the facile relativism that pervades contemporary social and academic life. On the other hand, he opposes the rationalism inherent in neo-contractarian theory - both in the idealized communicative-contract version promoted in continental European political philosophy by Jurgen Habermas, and in the idealized social-contract version of the theory of political justice promoted in the Anglo-American context by John Rawls. Against such tendencies, Professor Rescher's pluralist approach takes a more realistic and pragmatic line, eschewing the convenient recourse of idealization in cognitive and practical matters. Instead of a utopianism that looks to a uniquely perfect order that would prevail under ideal conditions, he advocates incremental improvements within the framework of arrangements that none of us will deem perfect but that all of us 'can live with'. Such an approach replaces the yearning for an unattainable consensus with the institution of pragmatic arrangements in which the community will acquiesce - not through agreeing on their optimality, but through a shared recognition among the dissonant parties that the available options are even worse.
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Review quote

Rescher provides a cogent and sustained attack on the thesis that consensus is necessary and sufficient and desirable for rationality, truth, communication, cooperation, and social order. He also offers a powerful argument in favor of dissensus ... Highly recommended for all libraries. * Choice *
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Rating details

8 ratings
3.5 out of 5 stars
5 12% (1)
4 38% (3)
3 38% (3)
2 12% (1)
1 0% (0)
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