The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes; With Corrections and Illustrations of Various Commentators Volume 4

The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes; With Corrections and Illustrations of Various Commentators Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1778 edition. Excerpt: ... sovereignly being honourable. I have lov'd thee 4 Leo. Make that thy question, and go rot! Dost think, I am so muddy, so unsettled, To appoint myself in this vexation? fully The purity and whiteness of my sheets, Which to preserve, is sleep; which being spotted, Is goads, thorns, nettles, tails of wasps? Give scandal to the blood o'the prince my son, Who, I do think, is mine, and love as mine, Without ripe moving to't? Would I do this? Could man so blench 5? Cam. I must believe you, fir; I do; and will fetch off Bohemia for't: Provided, that when he's remov'd, your highness Will take again your queen, as yours at first; Even for your son's fake; and, thereby, for sealing The injury of tongues, in courts and kingdoms Known and ally'd to yours. love of which you boast, the subject of your future conversation, and go to the grave with it..Question, in our author, very often has this meaning. So, in Measure for Measure: "But in the loss of question;" i.e. in conversation that is thrown away. Again, in Hamlet: "questionable shape" is a form propitious to conversation. Again, in As you like it: an unquestionable spirit," is a spirit unwilling to be conversed with. Again, in Shakespeare's Tarqui/t and Lucrece: "And after supper, long he questioned "With modest Lucrece, &c." Steeyens. / have lov'd tbce----In the first and second folio, these words are the conclusion of Camillo's speech. The later editors have certainly done right in giving them to Leontes, but I think they would come in better at the end of the line: Make that thy question, and go rot! i I have lov'd thee. Tyrwhitt. 5 Could man so blench? To blench is to start off, to shrink. So, in Hamlet; "if he but blench, "I know ray...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 192 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123650013X
  • 9781236500137