The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare, Printed from the Text of J. Payne Collier, with the Life and Portrait of the Poet; Criolanus. Romeo and Juliet. Timon of Athens. Julius Caesar. Macbeth

The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare, Printed from the Text of J. Payne Collier, with the Life and Portrait of the Poet; Criolanus. Romeo and Juliet. Timon of Athens. Julius Caesar. Macbeth

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...thou this picture, Apemantus? Apem. The best, for the innocence. Tim. Wrought he not well that painted it? Apem. He wrought better that made the painter; and yet he's but a filthy piece of work. Pain. Y' are a dog. Apem. Thy mother's of my generation: what's she, if I be a dog? Tim. Wilt dine with me, Apemantus? Apem. No; I eat not lords. Tim. An thou should'st, thou 'dst anger ladies. Apem. O! they eat lords; so they come by great bellies. Tim. That's a lascivious apprehension. Apem. So thou apprehend'st it. Take it for thy labour. Tim. How dost thou like this jewel, Apemantus? Apem. Not so well as plain-dealing, which will not cost a man a doit. Tim. What dost thou think't is worth? Apem. Not worth my thinking.--How now, poet! Poet. How now, philosopher! Apem. Thou liest. Poet. Art not one? Apem. Yes. Poet. Then, I lie not. Apem. Art not a poet? Poet. Yes. Apem. Then, thou liest: look in thy last work, where thou hast feign'd him a worthy fellow. Poet. That's not feign'd; he is so. Apem. Yes, he is worthy of thee, and to pay thee for thy labour: he that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer. Heavens, that I were a lord! Tim. What would'st do then, Apemantus? Apem. Even as Apemantus does now, hate a lord with my heart. Tim. What, thyself? Apem. Ay. Tim. Wherefore? Apem. That I had no angry wit to be a lord.--Art not thou a merchant? Mer. Ay, Apemantus. Apem. Traffic confound thee, if the gods will not! Mer. If traffic do it, the gods do it. Apem. Traffic's thy god; and thy god confound thee! Trumpets sound. Enter a Servant. Tim. What trumpet's that? Serv. 'T is Alcibiades, and Some twenty horse, all of companionship. Tim. Pray, entertain them; give them guide to us.--Exeunt Some Attendants. You must needs dine with me.--Go not you...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236506766
  • 9781236506764