The Plays and Poems of Henry Glapthorne Now First Collected; The Tragedy of Albertus Wallenstein. the Ladies Priviledge. Poems

The Plays and Poems of Henry Glapthorne Now First Collected; The Tragedy of Albertus Wallenstein. the Ladies Priviledge. Poems

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...and ne're part Till one be slaine, and the survivour sure As death to hang for't. Fran. Excellent, I love a msui that cares not for hanging. Ador. Then to their further glory, which takes off All the disgrace of halter, they are sure Ere they be scarce cold, to be Chronicled In excellent new Ballads, which being sung Ith' streets 'mong boyes and girles, Colliers, and Car-men, Are bought as great memorialls of their fames, Which to perpetuate, they are commonly stuck up With as great triumph in the tipling houses, As they were scutchions. Fran. Better: yet I'de give A hundred Ducats to be chronicled In such a historicall Canto: who composes them? Ador. They have their speciall Poets for that purpose Such as still drinke small Beere, and so are apt To spit out lamentable stuffe; then for their cloathes They hate a cut domesticke, but imitate The French precisely gallants, weare their long Parisian Breeches, with five poynts at knees, Whose tagges concurring with their harmonious spurres Afford rare musicke; then have they Doublets So short ith' waste, they seeme as 'twere begot Vpon their Doublets by their Cloakes, which to save stufse Are but a yeares growth longer than their skirts; And all this magazine of device is furnish'd By your French Tayler: what Country man is yours? Fran. A Genoese. Ador. Fie, change him Monsieur, You have heard a Spanish Count's Lately arriv'd, without any advice, how'd you salute him? Fran. Thus sir, after our Italian fashion. Ador. That's too vulgar; You must accost him thus with a state face, As if your beard had beene turn'd up that morning By advice of all the Barbers in the City, As you had drest you in a Looking-glasle, Proper to none but the Dukes privy Counsellors: K Pronounce your Befolas mams with a grace, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579275
  • 9781236579270