A Plan of the English Commerce; Being a Compleat Prospect of the Trade of This Nation, as Well the Home Trade as the Foreign. in Three Parts. Part I. Containing a View of the Present Magnitude of the English Trade ... Part II. Containing

A Plan of the English Commerce; Being a Compleat Prospect of the Trade of This Nation, as Well the Home Trade as the Foreign. in Three Parts. Part I. Containing a View of the Present Magnitude of the English Trade ... Part II. Containing

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1728 edition. Excerpt: ...perhaps, and'tis a great Step, if they can do that; but it must be remembred, that it is because their Government obliges them to make Shift with it, and to wear their own Works, however defefitive; a Wisdom we cannot arrive to, tho' we have the Manufafiture in its utmost Perfefitionz Of-which in its Order. BUT after all, they do not supply themselves neither," and in Spite of the severest Prohibition, in Spite of Tyranny, and the Terror of an absolute Government, they do, and will get English 'Manufafitures in, and do import very great Quantities too, as I could demonstrate by undeniable Evidences of Fafit. WHAT else means the great and sudden Export of English Goods to Lczghorn, more just after the Stop of the Englzs Commerce with France than ever betore? what the continued Export of the same Goods to Dunkirk? and above all, what means the Commerce between Holland and France by the Maei and the Samhre, and by the Lyr and the Scheld, ' AND why? if the French make their Manufafitures equal to others, Isay, Why is it, that that when the French Gentlemen make a Tour over hither to see the Country, or to visit the Court, they bring no more Clothes with them, than those on their Backs, but make them more Clothes as soon as they come hither, and always carry several Suits of Clothes Home with them? ON the contrary, if an English Gentleman goes Abroad into France to travel, he always makes himself new Clotl1es, and carries them with him; I speak now of the Gentlemen of Quality that do not want Clothes, or Money to buy them. THE Reason is plain, the Frenchman can get none so good at Home as he can buy Abroad, and the Englishman can get none so good Abroad, as he can buy at Home. IT is the like with the Linen and Lace in Holland and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236933095
  • 9781236933096