The Plain of Troy Described; And the Identity of the Ilium of Homer with the New Ilium of Strabo Proved, by Comparing the Poet S Narrative with the Present Topography

The Plain of Troy Described; And the Identity of the Ilium of Homer with the New Ilium of Strabo Proved, by Comparing the Poet S Narrative with the Present Topography

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ...this position, it was agreed to stake the issue of the war upon the result of a single combat between Paris and Menelaus. The troops on each side sat 1 Rennell's Observations on the Plain of Troy, p. 121, and his map No. 2. 3 II. n. 464. 3 n. n. 780-788. 4 II. n. 808-815. 5 n. m. 1-15. II. ni. 161. down, leaning on their shields, and with their spears stuck in the ground.1 Solemn sacrifices were to precede the duel, and for this purpose Hector sends to the city for two lambs, and Agamemnon sends to the camp for one. Now if Troy was on Hissarlik, the statement is consistent with the topography. The one messenger, in going and returning, would travel a mile and a half or two miles, the other four or five. Both would be loaded with live animals, wine, fruits, &c, and the sacrifice might be completed probably in an hour and a half. But if Troy was at Lechevalier's site, Agamemnon's messenger would have eighteen miles to travel, Hector's only two, and a forenoon must have been consumed in completing the sacrifice. Now the details given, induce a belief, that the articles from the camp arrived as soon as those from the city.2 And an outline of the transactions before and after the duel, with the battles, negotiations, marchings, comprised within the space of this one day, will demonstrate that not more than a minute fraction of it--certainly not a tenth part--could be spared for fetching the victims, and performing the rites. The morning and evening too, are so distinctly marked, as to leave no doubt that a single day only is included. At day-break Agamemnon calls the Greeks to an assembly, and proposes to them to return home;--they joyfully agree, --disperse among the ships to prepare for their departure, --are summoned to a second assembly, where...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 80 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 159g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236628993
  • 9781236628992