A Plain and Practical Treatise on the Epidemic Cholera; As It Prevailed in the City of New York, in the Summer of 1832; Including Its Nature, Causes

A Plain and Practical Treatise on the Epidemic Cholera; As It Prevailed in the City of New York, in the Summer of 1832; Including Its Nature, Causes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...there were less than five hundred who were not habitually intemperate. One of our benevolent societies relieved during the last winter one hundred and fifty widows, whose husbands had all died of Cholera, and all of whom were drunkards. And in the case of intemperate persons, the disease was not only more rapid in its progress, but almost uniformly fatal, as the hospital practice amply proves. Indeed, one of the physicians who was incessant at his post in one of these establishments, told me that he had not known a single drunkard cured, by any treatment. These facts are thus presented, as introductory to the means of prevention about to be suggested, and on which our future visitation, and the extent of that visitation, should the epidemic again recur, will greatly depend. First, then, I remark, that as the remote cause exhibited itself first in filthy neighbourhoods, the Corporation should, before the warm weather commences, see that our streets, lanes, alleys, yards, and houses, are thoroughly cleansed and ventilated, and that all our docks, slips, wharves, and sewers, be carefully purified, and kept so by the vigilant inspection and authority of officers appointed for that purpose. Secondly. They should also see that all marshes, pools, or ponds of standing water, should be drained and filled up early in the Spring, and wherever there are filthy stables, whether for horses or cows, or pens in which swine are kept, they should be removed from the city, unless their filthiness can be prevented. Thirdly. Let our constituted authorities absolutely prohibit the traffic in ardent spirits, by wholesale or retail, in any population great, or small, when the approach of the Cholera is threatened. If this cannot be done in anticipation, it...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659295
  • 9781236659293