Piping Hot! (Pot-Bouille)

Piping Hot! (Pot-Bouille) : A Realistic Novel

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This is a new edition of "Piping Hot! (Pot-Bouille): A Realistic Novel," originally published in 1887 by "Vizetelly & Co.," of London, England. Part of the project Immortal Literature Series of classic literature, this is a new edition of the classic work published in 1887-not a facsimile reprint. Obvious typographical errors have been carefully corrected and the entire text has been reset and redesigned by Pen House Editions to enhance readability, while respecting the original edition. "Piping Hot!" (Pot-Bouille) follows the adventures of a young and ambitious man, Octave Mouret, who moves into a house on Rue de Choiseul, one of the immense "maisons bourgeoises" in Paris, in which several characters of the novel live and interact. In the beginning of the story, Octave Mouret meets Madame Hedouin, owner and director of a nearby shop, "The Ladies' Paradise," where Mouret is employed as a salesman. "Piping Hot!" is a fascinating story of love and ambition which follows the private lives of a number of individuals who pursue different occupations while living under the same roof. About the Author: Emile Francois Zola (born in Paris on April 2, 1840; died in Paris on September 29, 1902) was a journalist, a novelist, a playwright, and a political activist. He was one of the most influential French novelists of the 19th century and the founder of the literary and theatrical school of naturalism. Zola was a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Emile Zola's works include novels, dramas, poetry, and criticism, among which is his famous "Les Rougon-Macquart" (1871-1893), a cycle of twenty novels which depict various aspects of life and society, such as "L'Assommoir" (1877), the seventh novel of the series, about the suffering of the Parisian working-class; "Nana" (1880), the ninth installment, which deals with prostitution; "The Ladies Paradise" (1883), the eleventh novel (original title: "Au Bonheur des Dames"), which focuses on Octave Mouret, who, in "Pot-Bouille," meets Caroline Hedouin, the owner of a small silk shop; and "Germinal" (1885), the thirteenth novel in the series, which depicts the mining industry and is considered by some as his masterpiece. "Piping Hot! (Pot-Bouille)" was the tenth novel of the cycle and Zola's most sarcastic satire, which describes daily life in a newly constructed block of flats in late nineteenth-century Paris. Zola's open letter to French president Felix Faure, under the headline "J'Accuse...!," published on the front page of the newspaper "L'Aurore" on January 13, 1898, charging various French officials with a "terrible miscarriage of justice," reopened the case of the Jewish army officer, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who had been sentenced to Devil's Island. For that, Zola was himself sentenced to a year in prison but fled to England, returning one year later after Dreyfus' name had been cleared. Dreyfus was eventually reinstated as an officer and publicly decorated with the Legion of Honor. Zola's open letter to French president Felix Faure, under the headline J'Accuse...!, published on the front page of the newspaper L'Aurore on January 13, 1898, charging various French officials with a "terrible miscarriage of justice," reopened the case of the Jewish army officer, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who had been sentenced to Devil's Island. For that, Zola was himself sentenced to a year in prison but fled to England, returning one year later after Dreyfus' name had been cleared. Dreyfus was eventually reinstated as an officer and publicly decorated with the Legion of Honor.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 486 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 27mm | 708g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1514642352
  • 9781514642351

About Emile Zola

Emile Francois Zola (born in Paris on April 2, 1840; died in Paris on September 29, 1902) was a journalist, a novelist, a playwright, and a political activist. He was one of the most influential French novelists of the 19th century and the founder of the literary and theatrical school of naturalism. Zola was a major figure in the political liberalization of France. Emile Zola's works include novels, dramas, poetry, and criticism, among which is his famous "Les Rougon-Macquart" (1871-1893), a cycle of twenty novels which depict various aspects of life and society, such as "L'Assommoir" (1877), the seventh novel of the series, about the suffering of the Parisian working-class; "Nana" (1880), the ninth installment, which deals with prostitution; "The Ladies Paradise" (1883), the eleventh novel (original title: "Au Bonheur des Dames"), which focuses on Octave Mouret, who, in "Pot-Bouille," meets Caroline Hedouin, the owner of a small silk shop; and "Germinal" (1885), the thirteenth novel in the series, which depicts the mining industry and is considered by some as his masterpiece. "Piping Hot! (Pot-Bouille)" was the tenth novel of the cycle and Zola's most sarcastic satire, which describes daily life in a newly constructed block of flats in late nineteenth-century Paris. Zola's open letter to French president Felix Faure, under the headline "J'Accuse...!," published on the front page of the newspaper "L'Aurore" on January 13, 1898, charging various French officials with a "terrible miscarriage of justice," reopened the case of the Jewish army officer, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who had been sentenced to Devil's Island. For that, Zola was himself sentenced to a year in prison but fled to England, returning one year later after Dreyfus' name had been cleared. Dreyfus was eventually reinstated as an officer and publicly decorated with the Legion of Honor. Zola's open letter to French president Felix Faure, under the headline J'Accuse...!, published on the front page of the newspaper L'Aurore on January 13, 1898, charging various French officials with a "terrible miscarriage of justice," reopened the case of the Jewish army officer, Captain Alfred Dreyfus, who had been sentenced to Devil's Island. For that, Zola was himself sentenced to a year in prison but fled to England, returning one year later after Dreyfus' name had been cleared. Dreyfus was eventually reinstated as an officer and publicly decorated with the Legion of Honor.show more

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