The Pioneer Press of Kentucky; From the Printing of the First West of the Alleghanies, August 11, 1787, to the Establishment of the Daily Press in 1830 Volume 3

The Pioneer Press of Kentucky; From the Printing of the First West of the Alleghanies, August 11, 1787, to the Establishment of the Daily Press in 1830 Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...accuracy and fullness of detail." As much may be said of its literary merit. The Argus of Western America was established at Frankfort in February, 1806, by whom is not known at this _ day. The oldest among a number of copies in Col. Durrett's files, dated Friday, January 11, 1816, is volume 8, number 41, and shows Messrs. Gerard and Berry proprietors. Another copy, dated Wednesday, February 9, 1831, is volume 24, number 52, and Gervas E. Russell is proprietor. Who preceded these gentlemen in its control, and who con' Col. Major's Sketch. trolled it from its origin to their time, are alike unknown to the writer, except in the single instance of Hon. Amos Kendall. This distinguished gentleman at one time occupied an editorial position on the Argus, and wielded his pen in the interest of Gen. Jackson with such marked effect as to win a place in the old hero's cabinet when elected to the Presidency. He was a writer of more than ordinary brilliance. But it was as a statesman and politician he was best known to the people of Kentucky, and as such his career is familiar to all readers of Kentucky history. The number of the Argus mentioned above has, at the head of the first page, a wood-cut of the American eagle, bearing a scroll in its beak upon which is inscribed the Latin motto, "E Plurieus Unum." Above the out are the words, " By Authority," which would seem to imply that the publishers had to obtain the consent of the United States or of somebody else to use either the cut or the motto. The Argus was succeeded by the Yeoman, a paper estab ' lished February 13, 1840, and whose death has been chroni cled within a year past. Col. Major, so long the editor of the Yeoman, though belonging not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236970772
  • 9781236970770