Pictorial National Records; Embracing Descriptions of European and Asiatic Nations a Statistical View of the United States of America, and a History of the Great Rebellion Volume 2

Pictorial National Records; Embracing Descriptions of European and Asiatic Nations a Statistical View of the United States of America, and a History of the Great Rebellion Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ...covered by cavalry and small bodies of infantry beyond either flank, to provide against flank movements. Birney, with the 1st division of the Third Corps, was placed in front of Farifax Station, which was made the temporary depot of supplies; and by the disposition of his troops and the cavalry of Buford and Gregg, provided against any attempts of the enemy to gain his rear via the Occoquan, which they at one time threatened. The left of Meade's line proper rested at Union Mills, and was formed by the two remaining divisions of the Third Corps (French's). General Sedgwick, with the Sixth, was posted in the vicinity of Chantilly, forming the right of the line, with the cavalry division of Kilpatrick to protect his flank. The First Corps occupied the immediate heights of Centerville. The Second and Fifth were in readiness to be thrown wherever most needed. On Friday and Saturday the rebels pushed forward reconnoissances about Meade's position, and made vigorous demonstrations on his front and flanks. If Lee had seriously entertained any idea of seeking battle with the Union army in the position it had gained, the manner in which these attempts were met must have dissipated it. It is more probable, however, that they were simply meant to cover the work on which the main rebel force was these two days engaged; namely, the destruction of the railroad. Having accomplished this object with great completeness, the rebel army fell back from Meade's front. At 2 o'clock on Sunday morning, Ewell's corps moved back to Bealton, following the line of the railroad. Hill's corps moved back by way of Greenwich and Auburn, the two columns which had diverged at Bristoe converging again at Bristoe. On Sunday night their advance reached the Rappahannock, after a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 404 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 717g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236606051
  • 9781236606051