The Pictorial Book of Anecdotes of the Rebellion, Or, the Funny and Pathetic Side of the War; Embracing the Most Brilliant and Remarkable Anecdotical Events of the Great Conflict in the United States

The Pictorial Book of Anecdotes of the Rebellion, Or, the Funny and Pathetic Side of the War; Embracing the Most Brilliant and Remarkable Anecdotical Events of the Great Conflict in the United States

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ...General Ord was on the south of the court-house, near the railroad; the troops were in the most enthusiastic On receipt of this, General Lee at once dispatched another, requesting a personal interview for the object named in General Grant's previous communication, viz., the surrender of the entire rebel army. A flag of truce proceeded to Appomattox Court House shortly after noon, and at about two o'clock the two generals met at the house of Mr. W. McLean. General Lee was attended by General Marshall, his adjutant-general; General Grant, by Colonel Parker, one of his chief aids-decamp. General Grant arrived about fifteen minutes later than General Lee, and entered the parlor where the latter was awaiting him. The two generals greeted eacli other with dignified courtesy, and after a few moments conversation, proceeded to the business before them. Lee spirits, and the rebel army was doomed. I immediately alluded to the conditions Lee's last effort was that of attempting to named by General Grant for the surren Surrender of Gen. Lee and his Army to Gen. Grant cut his way through Sheridan's lines, but it totally failed. On the seventh, a correspondence, looking to the surrender of Lee's army, commenced between himself and General Grant, the purjiort of General Lee's first note being to ascertain the best terms on which he could surrender his army. General Grant's reply not being to Lee's mind, the latter communicated to General Grant 'a request for a personal interview at a certain place, at ten o'clock on the morning of the ninth, to arrange "terms of peace." Aa this was changing the question at issue, and under discussion, and one which General Grant had neither the inclination nor the authority to decide, he replied in a note which...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 382 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 680g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236566351
  • 9781236566355