Physiology, Exhaustive and Practical; A Series of Practical Lectures Delivered from Day to Day in the American School of Osteopathy

Physiology, Exhaustive and Practical; A Series of Practical Lectures Delivered from Day to Day in the American School of Osteopathy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1898 edition. Excerpt: ... recovery from the disease. In this case, at least in some of the fevered conditions, the increase of temperature represents a physiological not a pathological condition, in other words it represents the attempt of nature to restore the normal and establishes the principle that nature has always a tendency to return to the normal. While fever represents a disorder of the heat regulation it marks rather a symptom of the disordered condition in the increased metabolism, the heat condition representing a disturbance of the regulative heat mechanism. The incapacity of the body during fever for mechanical work indicates that all the energy or most of it passes into the heat form, represented by the lethargic condition of the body. This represents the lack of transformation from energy to mechanical activity. The fever symptoms are, (a) an increase in body temperature. This is not only true when the skin is flushed but also when the body is chilled as manifested in tremors. The flushed skin is a good heat conductor while the skin when pallid is a bad heat conductor. According to Finlayson the sub-febrile condition varies from 37.5 to 38.5 degrees, the moderate febrile condition from 39 to 39.5 the high febrile condition from 40 to 40.5 and the hyperpyretic condition 41 and over. (b) The increased production of heat is another element in the fever. This is partly due to the increase in the circulation which passes into the heat and to the increased metabolism resulting in oxidation. (c) This increased heat production, especially the metabolism, results in the languishing effect on the body and represents the wasting of energetic activity. So much is this regarded as the great element of fever that some physiologists ascribe the fever entirely to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 508 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 898g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236741129
  • 9781236741127