Physical and Historical Evidence of Vast Sinkings of Land on the North and West Coasts of France and South Western Coasts of England; Within the Historical Period

Physical and Historical Evidence of Vast Sinkings of Land on the North and West Coasts of France and South Western Coasts of England; Within the Historical Period

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...may really have existed. On The Identification Of The Isle Op Ictis. 156. We need only go back about to the time of "Domesday Book" for the origin of the Cornish name of St. Michael's Mount--" Carreg Coedh yn elos," i e, Rock of the wood in the enclosure. William Camden, who was born in 1550, and died 9th November, 1623, proves that the Cornish language had not become quite extinct even so lately as in his time. Ho says, speaking of the Damnonii, or inhabitants of Devon and Cornwall: --" The old Cornish tongue is almost quite driven out of the country, being spoken only by the vulgar in two or three parishes at the Land's End, and they, too, understand the English. In other parts little or nothing is known of it. 'Tis a good while since that only two men could write it; one of them, no scholar nor grammarian, was blind with age." In the "Penny Encyclopaedia," too, edition 1837, heading "Cornwall," we learn that: --" In the reign of Edward VI. a new revolt broke out connected with the religious revolution of that period." The Cornish men took up arms to sustain the Roman Catholic church, and besieged Exeter; but were. forced to raise the siege, and at last, though not without difficulty, were subdued. The change of the religious institutions of the country led to the change of the common language of Cornwall; the people, for the most part of British descent, with comparatively few Saxons settled amongst them, had retained a language of their own, a dialect of the Celtic." Camden gives the Lord's Prayer in Cornish, Welsh, and Armorie respectively, each of which languages resembles the others. "The introduction of the English church service paved the way for its gradual deline. When...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236604903
  • 9781236604903