Photosynthesis in Algae
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Photosynthesis in Algae

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II. Algal Symbiotic Associations 439 III. The Host-Algal Interface 439 IV. Carbon Acquisition, Fixation and Secretion 440 V. Photoacclimation and Photoadaptation 446 447 VI. Coral Bleaching and Photoinhibition References 450 Index 457 xv xvii xviii xix xx Color Plates - Color Plate I . A. Colonies ofthe green volvocalean alga Volvox. Scale bar, 30 Jlffi. B. A thallus ofthe red alga La urencia intrica ta. Scale bar, I em. C. Part of a thallus of the brown alga Sargassum, Scale bar, I cm. D. The cryptomonad Cryptomonas sp. under the light microscope. The several plastids in each cell are readily seen. The two equal Ilagella are not so easily seen under the light microscope. Scale bar, 2Jlffi. Photography by M Ricketts. See Chapter I, p. 4. Anthony W. Larkum, Susan E. Douglas and John A. Raven (eds): Photosynth esis in Algae, pp.CP1- CP.J. (c) 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in The Netherlands. Color Plates Color Plate 2. Confoc al images of chlorophyll fluorescence in various ehlorophytes. A. Oedogonium (species unknown, local collection); x3,300 . B. Cladophora (specie s unknown, local collect ion); x2,800. C. Spirogyra (species unknown , local collection) x31O. C.(
Inset) Spirogyra as in C. at x 3000. D. Klebsormidium fla ccidum (UTEX #LB2017) X2,300. E Nitella translucens (Wasteneys collection) X24000. All scale bars Slim except low magnification ofSpirogyra which is 100 J.1m.Micrographs kindly provided by Brian Gunnin g: for further details and descriptions, see Gunning and Schwartz, 1999. See Chapter 2, p. 17 .
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Product details

  • Hardback | 480 pages
  • 197.6 x 266.2 x 25.7mm | 1,365.33g
  • Dordrecht, Netherlands
  • English
  • 2003 ed.
  • 4 Illustrations, color; 31 Illustrations, black and white; XXIV, 480 p. 35 illus., 4 illus. in color.
  • 0792363337
  • 9780792363330

Table of contents

Introductory Chapters.- 1 The Algae and their General Characteristics.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. The Algae: Their Origins and Diversity.- III. The Green, Red and Brown Algae.- IV. The Chromophytes.- V. The Chlorarachniophytes.- VI. The Euglenophytes.- VII. Algal Genomes.- VIII. Algae as Sources of Natural Products.- IX. Concluding Remarks.- Acknowledgements.- References.- 2 Algal Plastids: Their Fine Structure and Properties.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Origin of Plastids.- III. Chlorophyte Plastids.- IV. Rhodophyte Plastids.- V. Cyanelles (Glaucocystophyte Plastids).- VI. Cryptophyte Plastids.- VII. Chlorarachniophyte Plastids.- VIII. Euglenophyte Plastids.- IX. Dinoflagellate Plastids.- X. Chrysophyte (Ochrophyte) Plastids.- XI. Phaeophyte, Bacillariophyte, Eustigmatophyte, Raphidophyte, Synurophyte, Pelagophyte, Silicoflagellate, Pedinellid and Xanthophyte Plastids.- XII. Haptophyte Plastids.- XIII. Apicomplexan Plastids.- XIV. Kleptoplastids.- XV. Microstructure of the Thylakoid Membrane.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 3 The Photosynthetic Apparatus of Chlorophyll b- and d-Containing Oxyphotobacteria.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Advances in Photosynthesis in Chlorophyll b- and d-Containing Oxyphotobacteria.- III. Green Oxyphotobacteria and the Endosymbiotic Theory of Green Plastids Evolution.- IV. Concluding Remarks.- Acknowledgments.- References.- Molecular Genetics of Algae.- 4 Structure and Regulation of Algal Light-Harvesting Complex Genes.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Higher Plant Light-Harvesting Complexes.- III. Algal Light-Harvesting Complexes.- IV. Origin and Evolution of the Light-Harvesting Antennae.- V. Concluding Remarks.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 5 Functional Analysis of Plastid Genes through Chloroplast Reverse Genetics in Chlamydomonas.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Algal Chloroplast Transformation.- III. Reverse Chloroplast Genetics of Photosynthesis.- IV. Several ycfs Encode Novel Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis.- V. Chloroplast Reverse Genetics of Essential Genes of Chlamydomonas.- VI. Conclusions and Prospects.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 6 Biochemistry and Regulation of Chlorophyll Biosynthesis.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. An Overview of Tetrapyrroles and Their Derivatives.- III. Chlorophyll Forms and Their Distribution in Algal Species.- IV. Early Steps in Chlorophyll Biosynthesis.- V. The Pathway from ALA to Protoporphyrin IX.- VI. The Iron Branch.- VII. The Magnesium Branch-Chlorophyll a Formation.- VIII. Biosynthesis of Chlorophyll b and Other Algal Chlorophylls.- Acknowledgments.- References.- Summary.- Biochemistry and Physiology of Algae.- 7 Oxygenic Photosynthesis in Algae and Cyanobacteria: Electron Transfer in Photosystems I and II.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Overview of Photosystems I and II.- III. Mutagenesis and Genetic Engineering of the Photosystems.- IV. Photosystem II function.- V. Photosystem II Structure.- VI. Photosystem I.- VII. Conclusions.- Acknowledgment.- References.- 8 Oxygen Consumption: Photorespiration and Chlororespiration.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Photorespiration.- III. Chlororespiration: A Mechanism to Maintain Thylakoid Membrane Energization in the Dark?.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 9 The Water-Water Cycle in Algae.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. The Water-Water Cycle in Plant Chloroplasts.- III. Operation of the Water-Water Cycle in Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae.- IV. Scavenging System of O2- and H2O2 in the Algal Water-Water Cycle.- V. Physiological Functions of the Water-Water Cycle in Cyanobacteria and Eukaryotic Algae.- VI. Concluding Remarks.- Acknowledgment.- References.- 10 Carbohydrate Metabolism and Respiration in Algae.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Carbohydrate Metabolism: Low M, Compounds.- III. Carbohydrate Metabolism: Storage Polysaccharides.- IV. Carbohydrate Metabolism: Structural Polysaccharides.- V. Respiration: Carbon Pathways.- VI. Respiration: Redox Reactions and Energy Conservation.- VII. Respiration: Spatial and Temporal Aspects.- VIII. Quantifying Carbohydrate Metabolism and Respiration in Relation to Growth and Maintenance.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 11 Carbon Acquisition Mechanisms of Algae: Carbon Dioxide Diffusion and Carbon Dioxide Concentrating Mechanisms.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Rubisco Kinetic Properties in Relation to the CO2 and O2 Concentrations in Cyanobacterial and Algal Habitats.- III. Lines of Evidence Used in Distinguishing Organisms Relying on Diffusive CO2 Entry from Those Using Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms (CCMs).- IV. Occurrence and Mechanism of CCMs.- V. Evolution of CCMs.- VI. Conclusions and Prospects.- Acknowledgments.- References.- Light-Harvesting Systems in Algae.- 12 Modeling the Excitation Energy Capture inThylakoid Membranes.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Structural Composition of the Thylakoid Membrane.- III. Experimental Approaches.- IV. Kinetic Modeling of the Thylakoid Membrane.- V. Concluding Remarks.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 13 Light-Harvesting Systems in Algae.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Chlorophylls.- III. Light-Harvesting Proteins.- IV. Optimizing Light-Harvesting Architecture.- V. Problems with Photosystem II.- VI. Off-Loading Excess Light Energy: Xanthophyll Cycle and Reaction Center Sinks.- VII. Control of Light Harvesting.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 14 Red, Cryptomonad and Glaucocystophyte Algal Phycobiliproteins.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Structure and Components of Phycobilisomes.- III. Molecular Biology of Red Algal, Glaucocystophyte and Cryptomonad Phycobiliproteins.- IV. Phycobiliprotein Structure.- V. Phycobiliprotein Types.- VI. Phycobiliprotein Crystal Structure.- VII. Bilin Chromophores.- VIII. Energy Transfer.- IX. Applications/Industrial Uses.- References.- 15 Carotenoids of Light Harvesting Systems: Energy Transfer Processes from Fucoxanthin and Peridinin to Chlorophyll.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Distribution of Carotenoids in Algae.- III. Optical Properties of Carotenoids in Relation to Functions.- IV. Functions.- V. Antenna Function of Carotenoids in Algae.- VI. Electronic States and Dynamic Properties of Molecules.- VII. Energy Transfer Processes and Mechanism.- References.- General Aspects of Photosynthesis in Algae.- 16 Photoinhibition, UV-B and Algal Photosynthesis.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. The Algal Light Climate.- II. Photoinhibition by PAR.- III. Effects of UV Radiation.- IV. Photoinhibition and UV Stress in the Field.- V. Scope for Further Research.- Acknowledgment.- References.- 17 Adaptation, Acclimation and Regulation in Algal Photosynthesis.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. The Range of Resource Availabilities and Other Environmental Factors within Which Algae Can Photosynthesize.- III. Adaptation of the Photosynthetic Apparatus.- V. Adaptation of Algal Photosynthesis to Environmental Extremes.- VI. Acclimation of Algal Photosynthesis.- VII. Regulation of Algal Photosynthesis.- VIII. Rates of Regulation and Acclimation.- IX. Conclusions.- Acknowledgments.- References.- 18 Photosynthesis in Marine Macroalgae.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Radiation Conditions in Coastal Waters.- III. Light Absorption by Macroalgae.- IV. Determination of Photosynthetic Rates.- V. Effects of Excessive Light on Photosynthesis.- VI. Algal Photosynthesis Under Low Light Conditions.- VII. Seasonal Photosynthetic Performance of Macroalgae.- VIII. Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthesis and Respiration to Temperature and Salinity.- References.- 19 Photosynthesis in Symbiotic Algae.- Summary.- I. Introduction.- II. Algal Symbiotic Associations.- III. The Host-Algal Interface.- IV. Carbon Acquisition, Fixation and Secretion.- V. Photoacclimation and Photoadaptation.- VI. Coral Bleaching and Photoinhibition.- References.
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Review Text

From the reviews:

"The reviewed book belongs ... to the well-known series 'Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration' ... . The book consists of 19 chapters written by well-known photosynthesis researchers working in countries all over the world. ... The book is supplemented with a good subject index. ... The book brings a basic material for every laboratory dealing with algae or light-harvesting complexes." (Z. Sesták, Photosynthetica, 2006)

"This book, the 14th volume of the series 'Advances in photosynthesis and respiration' successfully embraces in 479 pages all the major fields within the wide topic of algal photosynthesis. ... The quality of the figures and indeed the execution in general are of high standard. I have no hesitation in recommending the book to undergraduate students and to researchers in diverse fields of algology, plantphysiology, photosynthesis and evolutionary sciences. It can be used equally well as a study book or as a scientific source book." (K. Szabó, Acta Botanica Hungarica, Vol. 46 (3-4), 2004)
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Review quote

From the reviews:





"The reviewed book belongs ... to the well-known series `Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration' ... . The book consists of 19 chapters written by well-known photosynthesis researchers working in countries all over the world. ... The book is supplemented with a good subject index. ... The book brings a basic material for every laboratory dealing with algae or light-harvesting complexes." (Z. Sestak, Photosynthetica, 2006)


"This book, the 14th volume of the series `Advances in photosynthesis and respiration' successfully embraces in 479 pages all the major fields within the wide topic of algal photosynthesis. ... The quality of the figures and indeed the execution in general are of high standard. I have no hesitation in recommending the book to undergraduate students and to researchers in diverse fields of algology, plantphysiology, photosynthesis and evolutionary sciences. It can be used equally well as a study book or as a scientific source book." (K. Szabo, Acta Botanica Hungarica, Vol. 46 (3-4), 2004)
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