Photometric Observations Made Principally with the Equatorial Telescope of Fifteen Inches Aperture During the Years 1877-79 Volume 27

Photometric Observations Made Principally with the Equatorial Telescope of Fifteen Inches Aperture During the Years 1877-79 Volume 27

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...XXIV., the first three columns give the number for reference, the number in Table I., and the date. The next column gives the name of the satellite observed, and the planet with which it was compared. The fifth column gives the assumed difference in stellar magnitudes of the satellite and Saturn, not including the efiect of the ring. These values are taken from Chapter IX. The sixth column supplies the correction to be added to the fifth column to give the true difference in brightness between the satellite and the planet observed. In the case of Mars, this correction is deduced from the mean albedo, the light ratio, and the altitudes of Mars and Saturn, as on page 100. In the case of Saturn, the correction relates only to the ring, and is found as on page 99. The seventh column gives the mean reading, and the eighth five times its logarithmic cosecant. This equals the observed difierence in magnitudes of Saturn as seen in the small telescope, and the satellite as seen in the large telescope. The difference in light of the planet and satellite will equal the sum of the fifth and sixth columns, as determined by computation, or it will equal the unknown constant plus the eighth column, as found by observation. The constant given in the ninth column will accordingly be found by subtracting the amounts given in the eighth column from the sum of the corresponding quantities in the fifth and sixth columns. The mean of all its values is 10.66, and the residuals from this mean are given in the tenth column. The last column gives the initial of the observer. TABLE XXIV. CONSTANT OF PHOTOMETER D BY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SATELLITES OF SATURN. The observations of the variable satellite Iapetus, and of the combined light of Rhea and Dione have been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236905695
  • 9781236905697