The Photographic Negative; Written as a Practical Guide to the Preparation of Sensitive Surfaces by the Calotype, Albumen, Collodion, and Gelatin Processes, on Glass and Paper, with Supplementary Chapters on Development, Etc., Etc

The Photographic Negative; Written as a Practical Guide to the Preparation of Sensitive Surfaces by the Calotype, Albumen, Collodion, and Gelatin Processes, on Glass and Paper, with Supplementary Chapters on Development, Etc., Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...after each change, and allowing it to settle before decanting the water. If this method be adopted a double tubed decantation flask will be found very convenient; a piece of clean muslin is tied over the small tube and the emulsion introduced through the large one. It is well tosqueeze the emulsion through the canvas once more when half washed. A half hour's washing in this way will probably eliminate all the soluble salts. Capt. Abney has recommended the1 following very simple washing apparatus, the use of which makes it possible to wash the emulsion in full daylight. Fig. 21 makes its construction sufficiently evident. A hole is perforA ated in the lid of a tin canister of sufficient size to admit a glass tube, C. This tube is connected with the watertap by a piece of well-washed black india rubber piping. A spout, D, is soldered to the canister. To prevent the emulsion from being carried over the top of the flask, a piece of muslin is tied over its mouth around the glass tube. The method of converting Davanne's cooker into a washing apparatus has already been given. When the washing is nearly completed a small quantity of the wash-water is placed in a glass and a few drops of a neutral solution of nitrate of silver are poured in. If the mixture examined by white light shows no coloration the washing is sufficient. Draining.--When the emulsion is sufficiently washed it is drained to remove the excess of water. A hair-sieve may be used for this purpose, or a piece of linen or open-meshed canvas tied over the top of a large earthen vessel. The emulsion should be allowed to drain two hours. At the end of that time it will be well to pour a few ounces of alcohol over the mass. Re-melting.--The emulsion is re-melted in the water-bath at a low...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236621808
  • 9781236621801