The Philosophy of Religion; Lectures Written for the Elliott Lectureship at the Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Penna., U. S. A., 1916

The Philosophy of Religion; Lectures Written for the Elliott Lectureship at the Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Penna., U. S. A., 1916

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...philosophy of a sceptical doctrine, critically reached 97 by a mind of the first order, regarding the reality of the soul as a substantial and perdurable subject of experience; that of David Hume. Hume is, in fact, what James would call a pure empiricist. To him there is only one order of being, the empirical or sensible, and any mental content that is not in the last analysis reducible to terms of that order is fictitious and imaginary. Now, if we carefully attend to the empirical order, we find that it is resolvable into a plurality of parts which have no stability in themselves and no real connections with other parts of the plurality. This being so, there is no principle of continuity that can bind the empirical into an unbroken order and, especially, there is no point of unity from which the plurality of perishable states can be organized into a one subject of experience. The doctrine of the one self that lies back of and owns the states is, therefore, an illusion. Hume establishes the empirical doctrine in detail in, (1) his sceptical refutation of the doctrine of spiritual substance, which consists in simply applying to the mind itself the logic by which Berkeley reduced the concept of material substance to an illusion, reaching the conclusion that nothing can be proved to exist in consciousness but a plurality of conscious states. When I look into my consciousness for the evidence of a unitary self, I never see anything but a particular state, and Hume is sure that nothing else exists and his scepticism as to spiritual substance is complete. (2) The second count in Hume's refutations is his sceptical analysis of identity as a real relation of existence. When Hume scrutinizes the empirical order, he finds in it no point of permanence in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236662016
  • 9781236662019