Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London; Giving Some Accounts of the Present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours, of the Ingenious, in Many Considerable Parts of the World Volume N . 137

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London; Giving Some Accounts of the Present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours, of the Ingenious, in Many Considerable Parts of the World Volume N . 137

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...on the proper motions of only six stars, and, therefore, notwithstanding the greater probable accuracy of the observations, and the more elaborate process of calculation by which it was arrived at, it is probably not of greater intrinsic value than the first. The principle on which it is based, namely, the supposition that the sum of the true proper motions of the stars is a minimum, and consequently that the direction to be assigned to the sun's motion must be that which will account for the greatest amount possible of the observed motions, was objected to by Burkhardt, on the ground that there is no more reason for supposing the sum of the true proper motions to be a minimum than a maximum, excepting on the hypothesis that the stars are more inclined to rest than to motion. But this objection seems to imply some misapprehension of the problem under consideration. No hypothesis respecting the disposition of the stars to rest or to motion is involved. The apparent proper motions are the results of the comparison of the catalogues, and the question proposed by Sir W. Herschel was simply to determine the point towards which the sun must be supposed to move, in order that, after deducting the parallactic effect, the amount of the residual motions might be the least possible. Burkhardt's memoir was published in the Connaissance des Temps for 1809. It contains formulae for the solution of the problem, with their application to several of the stars in Maskelyne's catalogue; but he found little accordance among the results, and concluded that we are not yet in possession of a sufficient number of facts to decide on the direction of the sun's motion. Biot, in the Additions to his Astronomie Physique, also considered the question of the translation of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236651294
  • 9781236651297