Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London; Containing Papers of a Mathematical or Physical Character Volume N . 207-208

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London; Containing Papers of a Mathematical or Physical Character Volume N . 207-208

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...equivalent was found to be in the case of the first solution in the case of the second solution, to which hydrogen sulphide had been lavishly added, a nearly normal value was obtained, Similar experiments were made with iron. This could not be introduced in the same way as the copper, for the metal appeared to become passive in contact with the strong nitrate solution and refused to dissolve. Two solutions were prepared by adding 1 gramme of crystallised ferric nitrate to 60 grammes of silver and adding sulphuretted hydrogen as before. The first solution gave the perfectly normal electro chemical equivalent 1-11s25 (evd), and the second, to which much more hydrogen sulphide was added, gave the value 1-11834 (740), also substantially normal. The ferric nitrate was strongly acid, and this fact must be taken into account in discussing the above result, but it is clear that the extraordinarily high electrochemical equivalent of the mother-liquors cannot be attributed to the presence either of iron or of copper. Addition of ferric nitrateto the mother-liquor produced no marked change in the electrochemical equivalent, the value obtained being 1'12141 (27b) and 1'12055 (300) before and 1'1271 (74cl) after the addition of 1 gramme of ferric nitrate to about 400 cub. centims. of 15 per cent. mother-liquor. J. Influence of Nitrite and Hyponitrite. The abnormally high deposits obtained with the silver voltameter have usually been attributed to anodic impurities. H Such impurities would normally be oxidised substances comparable with the persulphuric acids, with lead peroxide, or with silver peroxynitrate. RICHARDS has, however, made the suggestion that reduction may " The fact that this figure is somewhat lower than the normal may be due to the trace...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 344 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 617g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236626575
  • 9781236626578