Philosophical Experiments and Observations of the Late Eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and Geom. Prof. Gresh., and Other Eminent Virtuoso's in His Time

Philosophical Experiments and Observations of the Late Eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and Geom. Prof. Gresh., and Other Eminent Virtuoso's in His Time

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1726 edition. Excerpt: ...or Azimuth, Westward, and 71 Degrees Reclination, (z.e.) its Pole (in Fig. 3.) 19 Degrees from the Zenith Z, suppose of Oxford which is Distant from P, the Pole of the World, 38 Degrees 14 Minutes; also a Stile being any Ways inclin'd to this Plane, yet so as to point betwixt the Tropicks; as suppose G the Top of the Stile, or Gnomon of the Globe, has 23 Degrees Azimuth, Eastward, and 42 Degrees Distance from the Zenith, on any Day propos'd; suppose at the Summer Solstice, when the Sun is farther from the AEquator, than G from the AEquator; to find when the Sun shall begin, and cease to shine on the Plane, and whether the Shadow shall at all be Retrograde in the Morning; and if so, how much, and when it (hall be? (Like to which is the Calculation for the Evening). % From G draw a great Circle, touching the Tropick in T, and cutting the Dial-Circle in E; prodiice the great Circles G, till they cut the Dial-Circle in N, M. Suppose A the Point, where the Tropick cuts the Dial-Circle. First inthe Triangle GZP, we have GZ, ZP and the Angle GZP, thence we may find the Angle G P Z, and Z G P, and PG; then inthe right-angled Triangle PTG, we have P G, and PT, the Sun's Co-declination; thence we may have the Angle G P T, and the Angle PGT. 1 hen the Angle ZPG + GPT = ZPT, the Distance of the Sun from the Meridian, when the Shadow ceases to be Retrograde, or first changes its Way. In the Triangle ZG, we have - Z, Z G, and the Angle uZG; thence we may find - G, the Angle oGZ, and the Angle G v Z. In the Triangle PZ, we have Z P, Z and the Angle -ZP; thence we may have P the Angle p - Z, and -PZ; then the Quadrant r#---P--P-; and the Quadrant - m--? G = G j and the Angle P-Z+GoZ=PG--nm. Then the two.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236556062
  • 9781236556066