The Philippine Islands, Moluccas, Siam, Cambodia, Japan, and China, at the Close of the Sixteenth Century, by Antonio de Morga

The Philippine Islands, Moluccas, Siam, Cambodia, Japan, and China, at the Close of the Sixteenth Century, by Antonio de Morga

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 2010-12-01 edition. Excerpt: ...the cable to break it, and a negro, to whom the general promised his liberty, offered to go with a large chopper lowered over the bows to cut the cable when the ship reached it. The channel was cleared of the boats which were in it with artillery and arquebuse discharges, and on reaching the cable, what with the force with which the ship went, and the good use which the negro made of his chopper, the cable parted, and the ship passed through it. There remained to get through the many turns which the channel made before opening into the sea; it seemed impossible for a ship to get through them which was going out in haste, but God permitted it to pass through all, as though each turn had its breeze on purpose. The Japanese, who had come up in greater numbers, with their arquebuses, to the rocks and cliffs wherever the ship passed within range, did not neglect to molest her with many volleys, by which they killed one Spaniard in the ship and wounded others; the ship did the same, and with the artillery hit some of the Japanese, who, not being able to prevent the ship going out, remained without her. The general seeing himself out at sea, free from the past danger, and that a light north wind was beginning to blow, thought it best to venture to make the voyage to Manila, rather than seek and enter another Japanese port, and having set a jury mast1 instead of the mainmast, and the North wind growing fresher every day, in twelve days he crossed over to Luzon, by Cape Bojeador, and came off the mouth of the Bay of Manila, where he found the ship Jesus-Maria, which also came in distress by the channel of Capul; and the two ships in company, as they had gone out of the port of Cabit five months before, returned to put in there in distress, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236805186
  • 9781236805188