The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803; Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, ... Volume 48

The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803; Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, ... Volume 48

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...embarked without their little house. Hardly had they reached Calayan when the two fell sick; other fathers went to succor them, and all became sick; accordingly, they returned to the mainland one after another, and it was necessary to abandon the mission after the Dominican fathers had incurred large expenses for it. Afterward, this conquest was again undertaken, by Senor Basco in 1783; and this effort has been successful in maintaining there the Dominican fathers, converting those islandtransfer of some families, the greater part of there-remaining in their own islands-where, as they were accustomed to that mode of life, they desired no further privileges than their own liberty, even though it be with necessary inconveniences, which they felt little or not at all, being free from the yoke since their youth." (Concepcion, Hist, de Philipinas, xi, p. 304.) Cf. Salazar's sketch of the history of these missions, in chapter xxiii of Hist. Sant. Rosario (in our Vol. Xliii). See also, for both early and later events therein, Ferrando's Hist. PP. dominicos, iii, pp. 550-588, and iv, pp. 254-258, 330, 582-585. Concepcion ut supra) does not mention the date of the royal decree; but Ferrando states (iv, p. 423) that it was dated March 14, 1728, and that it granted for this purpose the sum of 3,398 pesos; the "3" may be a typographical error for "5," the amount as given (but spelled out) by Concepcion. Ferrando says that some three hundred families removed to the mainland, but that many more remained in their islands. ers to the faith. A commandant was stationed there with his garrison, which caused much expense, because it was necessary to send them all their supplies from Philipinas; for in all those islands the only...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236777263
  • 9781236777263