Philadelphia and Her Merchants; As Constituted Fifty @ Seventy Years Ago Illustrated by Diagrams of the River Front and Portraits of Some of the Prominent Occupants, Together with Sketches of Character and Incidents and Anecdotes of the

Philadelphia and Her Merchants; As Constituted Fifty @ Seventy Years Ago Illustrated by Diagrams of the River Front and Portraits of Some of the Prominent Occupants, Together with Sketches of Character and Incidents and Anecdotes of the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ... friend and neighbor, Melchoir Wisinger, helped the variety by the general flow of his wit, humor and friendly familiarity with young folks. He was a wire-worker by trade, vented his genius in the back room of his lower story, and exhibited its fruits in birdcages, sieves, etc., at the front window and door, where a review shows up the old gentleman in his porch, resting and supporting one of his legs--unbent and unbending from a white-swelling in his youth--fondling and joking with the youth of the neighborhood as they came within his call. His dame--second wife--erewhile the "Widow Sykes," is entitled to a tribute. She was handmaid to industry and frugality, and economized even day-dawn to lengthen time. She and Peter Hahn's boy were competitors for the first ray, of whom it was quaintly said that they both staid up all night for the prize in the morning. This old lady died April 26th, 1851, in her ninetieth year. She had had her day of fascination, and admiration followed her to the porch of her second matrimonial embark, for a jilted "Coelebs" often sat himself in an opposite porch, soliloquizing his mishap, and denouncing her liege lord as an imperfect concern. This is a sample of the olden time. Human nature echoes "Idem." Peter Delamar was a nautical instrument-maker next below, in the house afterward the residence of Singleton, the son-inlaw of Mrs. Holland, of Front near Market, of whom more anon. Beer-houses were les3 obnoxious than under our present code of refinement. A pint of beer was an allowable beverage, and a room for its enjoyment was undisputed authority for its legality. A good Presbyterian could and did vend and measure the juice of malt, with its hop tonic, sans reproclte, without fear of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236622235
  • 9781236622235