A Personal Narrative of a Visit to Ghuzni, Kabul, and Afghanistan, and of a Residence at the Court of Post Mohamed; With Notices of Runjit Sing, Khiva and the Russian Expedition

A Personal Narrative of a Visit to Ghuzni, Kabul, and Afghanistan, and of a Residence at the Court of Post Mohamed; With Notices of Runjit Sing, Khiva and the Russian Expedition : With Illustr. from Drawings Made by the Autor on the Spot

By (author) 

List price: US$22.39

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...both by Mussulmen and Kaffirs, who act as the sentinels or out-pickets of two opposing armies, to prevent invasion from either party. No persons but the venders of salt and itinerant workers of golden ornaments are allowed by the Kaffirs to enter their country. Kaffiristan commences from the mountains beyond the valley of Nijrau, to the THE KAFFIRS. 235 north of Kabul, and extends behind those of Taghau and Lughman to the frontiers of Bajawur. To the north it is bounded by Badukshan; and it forms the greater part of one side of the valley of Chitral, or Little Kashghar. The Kaffirs are on good terms with the Chitralis, and occasionally mix with them. My authority is the grandson of the exiled Rajah of Chitral, who was driven out by the present ruler, Shah Katore. I saw him in Little Tibet. The Mussulmen regard the Kaffirs, according to the name they give them, as infidels; the Kaffirs, on the other hand, detest the Mussulmen. The feuds between them are constant, and there are persons killed every year in Lughman. Such is the animosity that exists towards the Mussulmen there, that when a return from a foray is expected, the young Kaffir girls put walnuts and dried fruits into their bosoms, and advance to meet the men returning, who flourish their long 236 SINGULAR CUSTOMS. knives, with the heads of their victims upon the points. Those who have killed a Mussulman have then a right to snatch the walnuts and fruits from the girls' bosoms. When a cow is to be eaten at a feast, those who have not been blooded by the death of a Mussulman have their food handed to them over the carver's shoulder, and are pelted with cow-dung by the women. This almost unknown race say that they are Arabs, and are descended from the same tribe as Mahomed. I should...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236965086
  • 9781236965080