The Perceptionalist, Or, Mental Science; A University Text-Book

The Perceptionalist, Or, Mental Science; A University Text-Book

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ...is not conceived of as based exclusively on the relation of similarity. The conception of a collection of things may be distinguished from that of a kind of things, because the former is never based simply on similarity of nature. The generic, or logical, whole is seen whenever we think of any genus or species of things as comprising individuals, or subordinate classes. Mankind, the horse, civil government, thought, words, blows, and every conceivable kind of a thing, are logical wholes. Our idea either of a generic or of a collective whole is not obtained by a synthesis of our conceptions of its parts; and our ideas of the parts severally are not obtained from an analysis of our conception of the whole. On the contrary, in conceiving of these wholes, the parts are referred to indefinitely, as things subject to the constitutive relations; which reference may be regarded as the result of an analysis, or abstraction. And our specific, or singular, ideas of the parts of any such whole are not included in the conception of the whole as such. They are either given at first together with the conception of the whole, or, if subsequently formed, are obtained by a synthesis which successively distinguishes the different parts by the addition of differences, or accidents, to the common character. Such being the case, it is plain that the separation of a whole into its parts by analysis, and the uniting of parts into a whole by synthesis, do not take place in relation to collective and generic wholes, but that these processes must pertain to wholes of another nature. Thecompo-4. Let us consider those wholes which consist of mat'hemati definitely conceived-of parts. By this we do not mean c-'i; ami the that their parts are conceived of without any...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 196 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 358g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236512979
  • 9781236512970