Pennsylvania School Architecture; A Manual of Directions and Plans for Grading, Locating, Construction, Heating, Ventilating and Furnishing Common School Houses

Pennsylvania School Architecture; A Manual of Directions and Plans for Grading, Locating, Construction, Heating, Ventilating and Furnishing Common School Houses

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...Each apartment has a large volume of air at its disposal, in proportion to the area of its floor; and it is obvious, that the air of a room eight or ten feet high, is much more rapidly vitiated than that of one fifteen or twenty feet high. The average proportion of atmosphere allowed to each Pupil is three hundred and forty-three cubic feet, --equal to an area of seven feet square in a room whose ceiling is only seven feet high. The High School is supported by the city at an annual expense of about twenty thousand dollars. It has a liberal course of study, running through four years, differing somewhat from a college course, but equivalent to it, and those students who complete the course receive regularly the degrees of Bachelor and Master of Arts, a charter to this effect having been granted by the Legislature, The success of the Philadelphia High School contributed largely to the establishment of the New York Free Academy, an institution of similar character, and on a still more liberal footing. Both of these noble institutions, as well as all the subordinate subsidiary schools by which they are fed, are absolutely and entirely free, the only test and the only chance of admission being the individual merit of the applicant. The primary and main end of the High School was to elevate the whole system with which it is connected. It has accomplished in this respect all that was expected of it. Both the Pupils and the Teachers of the lower Schools have been stimulated to an extraordinary degree of activity, and their popularity has kept pace with their progress. When the High School was first projected, there were only about seven or eight thousand Pupils in the public Schools of Philadelphia, although the system had been in operation for..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236570561
  • 9781236570567