Pen and Ink Drawing; A Series of Drawings Showing Its Perfect Adaptability to the Modern Processes of Reproduction; With a Brief History and Description of the Arts of Drawing and Engraving on Wood, Lithography and the Modern Processes

Pen and Ink Drawing; A Series of Drawings Showing Its Perfect Adaptability to the Modern Processes of Reproduction; With a Brief History and Description of the Arts of Drawing and Engraving on Wood, Lithography and the Modern Processes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...from which the artist may be working. This method is used largely in chromo-lithography and through its use some of the most beautiful color combinations are rendered. In crayon work, which is now to be considered, the soft crayon is used to express the strongest values and the hard crayon the lighter values in a drawing. The artist generally transfers the outline of his subject in the same way as does the engraver. He then makes ready his crayons, cutting them to a point and placing them in holders. It has already been stated that the lithographic stone is very absorbent; for this reason he makes what is called a bridge, and on this rests his hand while working so that not a particle of moisture from his hand shall affect the surface of the stone. The bridge is merely a piece of smooth beveled wood resting at either end on two blocks which raise it slightly above the surface upon which he is working. If the subject which the artist has to treat is a portrait, he begins by suggesting the general masses of the light and shade, but not up to their full strength, noting carefully the structural features of the head and expressing the presence of bone where necessary. He now increases his values by working over the stone again until he has brought his drawing to the required finish. While engaged in this work he has to exercise the greatest care in the way in which he handles the crayon, since he must charge the granulated projections of the stone with the crayon and keep the granulated depressions free from it. In this way he can obtain transparency in his shadows and a crisp, sparkling effect. Unless he works thus carefully the different shades and shadows will appear woolly in texture in the drawing when completed, or, in other words, they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123676479X
  • 9781236764799