Pattern Maker's Assistant, Embracing Lathe Work, Branch Work, Core Work, Sweep Work, and Practical Gear Construction; The Preparation and Use of Tools; Together with a Large Collection of Useful and Valuable Tables

Pattern Maker's Assistant, Embracing Lathe Work, Branch Work, Core Work, Sweep Work, and Practical Gear Construction; The Preparation and Use of Tools; Together with a Large Collection of Useful and Valuable Tables

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1877 edition. Excerpt: ...whole height of the section into courses, the number of courses being regulated so as to have each of a convenient thickness. It is advisable, however, to have at least two courses in the flange, which will greatly increase its strength. After dividing one of the circles in the plan view into six parts, we draw lines from the points of division to the center, as shown; and then we make a template of one division, as shown at A, which must be made a little larger than the division, and this forms a template whereby to cut out the segments forming the courses which make up the flanges. A similar template, cut out somewhat larger than the space devoted to B, in Fig. 131, will serve to cut out the sections to be used in forming the body of the pattern. The flanges being made in two courses each, and there being six sections in each course, we shall require 26 pieces of the size of the large template; and allowing each half of the body likewise to consist of two courses, we shall require the same number, to form the body of the pattern, of the size of the small template. Our templates being made, we plane up some pieces of board a trifle thicker than the courses are intended to be. It is easier to plane up the pieces of the board while yet square, than to plane up the segments separately. From the template, with a black lead pencil, we mark off on the planed pieces of board the requisite number of segments, and cut them out with a band or jig saw. We now proceed to building up, for which purpose we employ a chuck as a base whereon to build. It will save time, however, to have two chucks, building one half of the pattern on each, and both halves simultaneously, which will give sufficient time for each course to dry, without requiring nails or...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236911326
  • 9781236911322