The Past and Present of Mill Creek Valley; Being a Collection of Historical and Descriptive Sketches of That Part of Hamilton County, Ohio; Containing Facts, Incidents, and Anecdotes Illustrating the Toils and Privations, as Well as the

The Past and Present of Mill Creek Valley; Being a Collection of Historical and Descriptive Sketches of That Part of Hamilton County, Ohio; Containing Facts, Incidents, and Anecdotes Illustrating the Toils and Privations, as Well as the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...and enviable reputation as MAPLEWOOD. IS 7 a place for suburban homes is justified by the success of the undertaking, and by the class of citizens resident there. Every street in this sub-division is graded and finished, set out with shade trees ten years old. Every lot, as yet unimproved, is ornamented with elms and maples and evergreens. and carpeted with green grass. The residences are tasteful and so varied in architectural designs, and so disposed as to produce the most pleasing effects. The view up Williams avenue from Lawn is one that recalls Euclid avenue in Cleveland. To stand at the intersection of Sturgis and Central avenue and look t0 the four points of the compass, is to obtain a view at once unique and beautiful. Lombardy poplars in their processional alignment on either side of those avenues, and crossing each other at this point, seem like so many nodding plumes when stirred by the evening breeze. To the east may be seen the Reading Hills crowned by Notre Dame Convent; to the north Va.vne Avenue M. E. Church and its duplicate spires; to the west the pretty little Episcopal Church; to the south, the new County Infirmary at Carthage. llaplevood is a consummate villa. As such it has isolation--individuality. Without fences, the houses seem to stand as in an immense park and in approaching it you naturally look for a magnificent Gate Lodge to mark the place of exit and of entrance. It is canopied by the municipal corporation of Hartwell, and with respect to that it is sometimes called the Maplewood Ward. But it nevertheless preserves and doubtless ever will maintain certain village characteristics----ever will be called Maplewood--ever will bear the impress of its founder and builder, whose taste conceived its plan and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236967763
  • 9781236967763