A Particular History of the Five Years French and Indian War in New England and Parts Adjacent; From Its Declaration by the King of France, March 15, 1744, to the Treaty with the Eastern Indians, Oct. 16, 1749, Sometimes Called Gov.

A Particular History of the Five Years French and Indian War in New England and Parts Adjacent; From Its Declaration by the King of France, March 15, 1744, to the Treaty with the Eastern Indians, Oct. 16, 1749, Sometimes Called Gov.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ... mentioned in any considerable work of history, and is yet to be sung by some native poet in the perhaps very distant future. But it is sure to be immortalized in song, no doubt worthy of the occasion. One local writer has indeed said in prose, that "it was a very manly fight;" and another, that "our men fought with such boldness and fortitude, as that had they been Romans, they would have received a laurel, and their names would have been handed down with honor to posterity." What loss the enemy sustained in this severe conflict was never known; but as they were near three to one of the English, they must have, in all probability, suffered at least in as great a proportion as their opponents. They also retired from the field without giving even a single shout, which they never do when successful. It was also observed, that when about a week after the battle they met some of the English captives, they looked downcast, "like dogs that had lost their ears." July 2. News reached New England that preliminary articles of peace had been agreed upon between the contending powers in Europe. July 5. A large party of about eighty Indians, and a few Frenchmen, surprised the garrison at Lunenburg, took prisoners Mr. John Fitch and his family, consisting of his wife and five children, and carried them through the wilderness to Canada, where they remained till the news of peace between England and France was received there; after which, with other captives, Mr. Fitch returned home by way of New York. Like hundreds of others he returned a beggar to his desolate home, with several small children dependent upon him. As he left under his own hand a circumstantial account of his capture, the reader may desire a more detailed narrative...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236625765
  • 9781236625762