The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 7; V. 34

The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 7; V. 34

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1793 edition. Excerpt: ...and to regard the one in question as extorted by avarice, and consented to through despotifm. The second circumstance to which he should call their attention was, their decree os the 19th of November. By this decree, the French engaged to assist all people in procuring their freedom--such a sreedom, he supposed, as they themselves enjoyed. We have seen, said he, French freedom in desinition; we have seen it in illustration, and have now an opportunity to compare the theory with the practice. Their conduct in Flanders assorded a specimen of the nature of their freedom. They had there endeavoured to propagate their doctrines, but sinding the inhabitants not difposed to give them so savourable a reception as they could have wished, they had taken the method os inculcating opinions os sreedom by sorce. Their General had issued a proclamation, that whoever should not embrace the tree of liberty, should be cut off as a wretch unsit to live. The noble Lord talked of their having given an explanation with respect to this decree. ' What sort of explanation had they given? They had stated that it was not their intention to assist a sew individuals, but only to intersere in cases where a great majority os the people should b disposed to shake off their government; so that in sact it was their intention to promote rebellion in other countries, and to declare war against all established Governments. This sort of war was an inexpiable war against all legitimate power, and which was only to terminate in its extinction. Formerly, the splendor of conquest had in some measure been pursued by the respect which had been paid to the government and rights of the conquered. The Romans were caresul to preserve the government, the habits, and customs of those nations...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 236 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236657179
  • 9781236657176