The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 15; V. 59

The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 15; V. 59

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1801 edition. Excerpt: ...the laws were now enforced without the least interruption. The law should, therefore, not be extended to the whole kingdom; and he was glad to fee that it was the intention of Government only to empower the Lord Lieutenant to take up and 3 D 2 try try by martial law such persons as he should discover to be dangerous to the Peace and Constitution of the Country. It was his only wish to mitigate the measure as much as possible, and to reinflate Ireland in the good opinion of the House. Sir FRANCIS BURDETT JONES said, that as no good "whatever could be expected from the renewal of coercive measures, he mult oppose any Bill that could tend to introduce them. Sir R. BUXTON contended that the exercise of martial law had produced the most salutary effects in Ireland, and for that reason he stiould vote for its further continuance. Sir J. PARNELL wished, that if the law was to pass, it might be for as short a period as possible, and, above all, that it might be exercised with moderation and humanity. He had read the Repo;t, and was sorry to find it so defective. It was iriuch to be regretted that it had not entered into a full and satisfactory detail of all the circumstances of the country. If that had been done, Ireland would be found to be in a state, not of rebellious refinance, but of deep despondency. Such a state required the application of a gentle remedy, not the exertion of oppressive force. The state of despondency and distress, which he affirmed to be that of Ireland, was evident from the great migrations that were daily taking place from that country, and which must prove so ruinous to its prosperity, and to the general interests of the Empire. To this, however, the Commilee had paid no attention. The veracity of the Gentlemen who composed...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 380 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 676g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236657365
  • 9781236657367