The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 12; V. 56

The Parliamentary Register; Or, History of the Proceedings and Debates of the [House of Lords and House of Commons]. Containing an Account of the Most Interesting Speeches and Motions Accurate Copies of All the Protests, Volume 12; V. 56

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1800 edition. Excerpt: ...with advantage, or procuring favourable terms, that the. enemy (hould see that we had been so dispirited by the reverses of our allies, as at once to be induced to desert them, and humbly to sue to them as the Lords of the Ascendant." He would ask, what had this country to apprehend from the greatness of France? He knew that there was danger to be apprehended from that country in war, and perhaps still greater in peace. But he could not perceive how that danger was increased at the present moment, so as to authorise the measure proposed. The motion appeared to him to be pregnant with great danger to the country, mischievous in its tendency, and in fact mischievous on the part of the honourable gentleman who moved it. If negotiation was proper, he would afle the House what reason had been adduced to prove that Ministers would not fee and act upon that propriety? They did negotiate in 1797, and thus gave evidence of their willingness to make peace whenever they thought that it could be done with safety and security to the country. What reasons, he would ask, had the House now to conclude that they would not do so again, when circumstances pointed out the measure as expedient? They had understanding to discriminate when these circumstances existed, and he was convinced, that they had integrity to decide and to act upon them. He would not follow the honourable gentleman through the details of the reasons which he said bad been given for rejecting the overtures for negotiation at the commencement of the present session. But there was one thing which he seemed, entirely to forget, when he argued that Ministers had reasoned on the instability of Bonaparte's power; and it was this, that it was impossible to foresee that his power would be stable, till...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 268 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 485g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236659325
  • 9781236659323