The Parliamentary Gazetteer of Ireland; Adapted to the New Poor-Law, Franchise, Municipal and Ecclesiastical Arrangements, and Compiled with a Special

The Parliamentary Gazetteer of Ireland; Adapted to the New Poor-Law, Franchise, Municipal and Ecclesiastical Arrangements, and Compiled with a Special

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...interesting parts of the Suck, as it appeared to me, are about Mount-Talbot, Rockwood, Castle-Strange, Curraghmore, where the banks, occasionally high, are diversified by considerable reaches of woods and plantations; the river also makes some very beautiful bends. Immediately above the bridge at Ballinasloe, the scenery is also pleasing, the stream gliding amongst tufted islands, with a brisk current, and keeping the gay painted little boats, riding at anchor before the town, in constant movement, swinging from side to side. About Donamon, the breadth of the valley is considerable, and the bottoms being overspread with marsh and bog, the Suck is nearly lost to view, from th- Roscommon side, or is only distinguishable where it dilates into pools, for lakes they do not deserve to be called. Donamon-castle, which stands on the Galway side, appears surrounded with woods, but the valley beneath is a dreary scene."--The Suck has, at its mouth, the appearance of a very fine navigable river; yet, except for row-boats and for Hat-bottomed boats of light burden, it is riot navigable even to Bullinasloe. A favourite project was long entertained of opening a navigation upon it to Ballinasloe, and it occasioned the making of various survey- at different periods commencing in 1802; but it was, at length, practically terminated by the questionable measure of cutting a canal to Ballinasloe, in extension of the Grand Canal. "If," say- Mr. C. W. Williams, the active and enlightened promoter of -team navigation, "the 40,000 granted for the Bsllinasloe Canal had been accompanied by an obligation to pay interest, it would not have been asked for probably. The Company might have expended the money so as to produce more...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 700 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 36mm | 1,229g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236547489
  • 9781236547484