Parliamentary Debates; Legislative Council and House of Representatives Volume 99

Parliamentary Debates; Legislative Council and House of Representatives Volume 99

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...to low-grade and refractory minerals, which previously we found we were unable to work profitably? But had the Government anything to do with that? I think the answer must be, No. Then, coming to the timber trade, people in the business have told me that the boom in the timber trade was caused by the scarcity of timbers in the European markets which can be out into wide boards. Our kauri meets the requirements of the trade in this respect, and consequently the increased demand. Have the Government anything to do with that? Again I think the answer must be No. Then we come to the price of cereals, and, in connection with cereals, I may tell honourable members, if they do not already know it, that wheat rules the prices of other grain. When wheat is dear oats and barley are dear; when wheat is cheap oats and barley are cheap. Now, what has caused the improvement in the price of wheat? I say that it was the Indian famine which interfered with the production, and consequently lessened the supply. Had the Government anything to do with that? Can they claim any credit for causing the Indian famine? I think, again, the answer must be No. I am quite willing to admit, as was pointed out by my honourable friend the member for Waitemata the other night, that the spending of the borrowed millions may have caused a certain briskness in trade; but the prosperity of the country is altogether dependent upon the prices which we receive for our staple products in the English market. If the country settlers receive remunerative prices for their products the country will be prosperous, and when they do not the country will not be prosperous. The Government have nothing to do with increasing the price of wheat. They have nothing at all to do with the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 708 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 36mm | 1,243g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236804325
  • 9781236804327