Paris in July and August 1830; An Historical Narrative of the Revolution of the 27th, 28th and 29th of July 1830 Its Causes and Effects the Orders in Council and Other Official Papers the Constitutional Charter with Its Modifications

Paris in July and August 1830; An Historical Narrative of the Revolution of the 27th, 28th and 29th of July 1830 Its Causes and Effects the Orders in Council and Other Official Papers the Constitutional Charter with Its Modifications

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1830 edition. Excerpt: ...up to an entresol(r), fortified himself as well as possible., and from his little fort, revenged the death of many of his fellow citizens. He was soon observed and besieged by the enemy; escape was impossible, and he fell gloriously fighting against the enemies of his country. We should fill an immense volume, were we to notice all the traits of bravery performed by the heroic Parisians during this revolution; and we are not a little embarrassed in the choice. A young man named Paulet, though unarmed, attacked a cuirassier, pulled him from his horse and seized his arms. He then assembled a few more hardy fellows, went (i) An intermediate floor in many french houses between the ground floor and the first. and attacked a party of cuirassiers and absolutely compelled them to a precipitate retreat. Another, named Petitjean (worthy of Robin hood) seized the guard house at Notre-Dame, mounted one of the spires, displayed the tricoloured flag, and set the tocsin (i) ringing. The heroism of a young man, a notary's clerk, named Lebreton deserves mention. Observing that a detachment of the guards in the rue Sl.'Honore were spreading terror and death, by their continual fire; stop a moment, said he to his comrades, I will soon finish this; he approaches the captain, and with a pistol stretches him dead on the pavement. As a trophy of his victory he seizes his gorget, and supported by the fire of his party returns safely to them. The detachment, harrassed and discouraged, shortly abandoned their post. (i) Alarm bell. M. Darmaing, editor of the Gazette des Tribunaux, was passing near the change, where two workmen were guarding the Swiss and guards that had surrendered: they told M. D. that they were excessively hungry, not having eaten for twelve hours. He...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236619730
  • 9781236619730