Parents, Gender and Education Reform

Parents, Gender and Education Reform

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Description

In Britain, as in other advanced industrial societies, such as the US, education is high on the public policy agenda. The concern is about how to maintain and improve educational standards. The right aims to give more power to parents as consumers, while the left aims to involve parents in educational processes. This book examines the evidence that has been amassed over the last 40 to 50 years in order to evaluate these two sets of political claims about how to improve educational provision. The book also reviews the effects that changing family structures, such as the growth of single-parent families and maternal employment, have on educational opportunities and performance. It considers the impacts on both children and parents, especially mothers. It concludes with a consideration of the future of education reform in the light of changing family structures.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 220 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 25.4mm | 498.95g
  • Polity Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0745606369
  • 9780745606361

Table of contents

1. Introduction: Parents, Education Reforms and Social Research 2. The Family Policy Context: The War Over the Family and Family Life Changes: 1944-1992 3. The Education Policy Context: The Idea of a `Meritocracy' from 1944-1976 4. The Education Policy Context: The Idea of a `Parentocracy' from 1976-1992 5. Parents and Education: The Social Democractic Reformer-Researcher Over Equal Opportunities 6. A Parental `Voice' in Education: As Community or Consumer Involvement? 7. Parental or Family Choice: Of School or of Education 8. Parental Involvement for School Effectiveness or Home Improvement? 9. Mothers in Education or Mum's the Word? 10. Debating the Effects of Family Changes and Circumstances on Children's Education 11. Conclusions: Family Changes, Social Research and Education Reforms.show more