Papers and Addresses; Naval and Maritime from 1872 to 1893 Volume 2

Papers and Addresses; Naval and Maritime from 1872 to 1893 Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...source of incalculable strength and happiness to this land.' From an Imperial point of view, the best defence of Navy best the colonies consists in a powerful Navy; and it is because the naval service is constituted in part for the defence of the colonies that we may reasonably claim from all our dependencies contributions in equitable proportions, to be mutually and amicably determined, towards the naval expenditure of the country. The latest tables, showing the progress of British r?t?rS8of mercantile shipping, give the total tonnage of the snipping mercantile navy of the British Empire at 8,133,837 tons, and the tonnage of the United Kingdom only at 6,336,360 tons. The difference between these amounts (1,800,000 tons) represents a total tonnage for the colonies which is little short of the combined tonnage of the French and German Empires. Tt must be evident that the owners of such a large tonnage will be quite able to contribute their share of the cost of defending the harbours from which they trade. Tt has been suggested by Captain Colomb, R.M.A., A colonial that one of the home dockyards--Pembroke, for ex-dockyard ample--might be closed, and the staff transferred to a dockyard which should be established at Sydney or Melbourne. Captain Colomb urges that, with our remaining dockyards, and the boundless resources of our private trade, we should be abundantly able to provide for the construction of new ships and for the repairs of the Navy, even in times of the most pressing emergency; while, on the other hand, the growing importance of the Russian Navy in the Pacific, the extension of British trade over most of the islands in that vast ocean, and the great distance which separates our Australian territories from the mother-country, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236877012
  • 9781236877017