The Pantropheon or History of Food, and Its Preparation from the Earliest Ages of the World; Embellished with Forty-Two Steel Plates

The Pantropheon or History of Food, and Its Preparation from the Earliest Ages of the World; Embellished with Forty-Two Steel Plates

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...more or less orbicular, whose envelope bristles with calcareous points, on which account they were compared to hedgehogs. The Greeks thought them delicious when caught at the full moon," and prepared with vinegar, sweet cooked wine, parsley, and mint.4' Oxymel often replaced vinegar.2" The Romans also esteemed highly this dish, which was recommended to sluggish appetites under the auspices of the faculty;"e and Apicius furnished the following recipe for the preparation of it: --"Procure a new saucepan," thus says the great master, " place in it a little oil, garum, sweet wine, and pepper. When the mixture begins to boil, stuff the sea hedgehogs, then submit them to the action of a slow fire; add a large quantity of pepper, and serve.""' MUSSEL. The two great nations of antiquity haw granted uncommon praise to mussels, and partook of them at their most sumptuous feasts. At the wedding repast of the graceful Hebe, Jupiter wished the inhabitants of Olympus to exchange for this shell fish their celestial though monotonous ambrosia.2." Epicharmus, who records the fact, does not inform us with what sauce the chef de cuisine of the gods dressed the flesh of those mussels. The reader must thus content himself with the seasoning invented by simple mortals, and which appeared good to them. It was composed of a suitable mixture of pepper, alisander, parsley, mint, with a quantity of cummin seed, a little honey, vinegar, and garum.2" With this mixture they covered the boiled and widely opened mussels, and the guests found it impossible to satiate themselves with this dish, so much more digestible and nourishing than oysters.210 SCALLOP. The effeminate inhabitants of Tarentum, the abode of luxury, delighted in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236533682
  • 9781236533685