Panorama of Nations; Or, Journeys Among the Families of Men a Description of Their Homes, Customs, Habits, Employments and Beliefs, Their Cities, Temples, Monuments, Literature and Fine Arts

Panorama of Nations; Or, Journeys Among the Families of Men a Description of Their Homes, Customs, Habits, Employments and Beliefs, Their Cities, Temples, Monuments, Literature and Fine Arts

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1892 edition. Excerpt: ...escape them. BRAVE SOLDIERS. The weapons of the Belooches are the lance, sabre and, occasionally, firearms. They are braggarts of great power, but unlike most of that class back their words with their deeds; for there are no better soldiers in Asia than they. They are not only brave in the assault, but are firm in withstanding it. When fighting under native leaders they attack in small parties of about a dozen soldiers, who tie their cotton tunics together, and in case one of their number is wounded, those behind untie his tunic, fasten the front file together again and remove the injured to the rear. In their conflicts with the Afghans, British soldiers have had occasion to test the metal of the Belooches; since their country is on the direct route from India, and Bolan pass in Northwestern Belochistan is the only open gate, of convenience, to Afghanistan. This and the pass of Gundwana are the only doors to both Beloochistan and Afghanistan from the lower Indus. Upon one occasion the British spent six days in forcing Bolan pass, which is a series of ravines rising gradually for fifty-five miles, the last one being nearly six thousand feet above the level of the sea. Both passes guard the approach to Kelat, the capital--notwithstanding which, the British have several times occupied it. The capital is a city of 12,000 or 15,000 people, built on a hill and surrounded by high mud walls. Spears, swords and muskets are the chief manufactures, its trade and that of the country in general being monopolized by Afghan merchants. The Khan of Kelat rules the city and the province, and is usually acknowledged as the leader of the Belooches in time of war. He is a mere feudal chief when lance, sabre and gun are put away, his authority beyond Kelat extending...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 382 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 680g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123660119X
  • 9781236601193