The Panmure Papers; Being a Selection from the Correspondence of Fox Maule, Second Baron Panmure, Afterwards Eleventh Earl of Dalhousie Volume 1

The Panmure Papers; Being a Selection from the Correspondence of Fox Maule, Second Baron Panmure, Afterwards Eleventh Earl of Dalhousie Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...died June 28th. siderate as to send me this morning. You can easily imagine, my dear friend, all I suffer and feel at this dreadful intelligence, for I have known and valued Lord Raglan from a boy, and his loss, not only as a man but also as a valued and respected public servant, at the first moment is fearful to contemplate. God give us strength to bear up against all these sad afflictions that come upon us. What a lesson it is to all of us never to be elated with our success! I can conceive the anxiety this event has caused you and the Government. God grant that my dear, excellent friend Brown may recover sufficiently to take the command of the Army, but at all events we know it is in safe hands in those of our friend Simpson. GENERAL SIMPSON TO LORD PANMURE Crimea, June 30, 1855. Gloom in I have kept you informed of the events of the last few camp. days by telegraph. You may easily believe the gloom that pervades this Camp! Sir George Brown goes away this morning, Pennefather is gone some days ago--both decided loss to the Army. The weather is cool, and cholera therefore on the decline--I do not think the deaths from it just now exceed 20 a day. I dread the return of heat, however, for, if cholera becomes epidemic, our men are so worn out that they will possibly sink in great numbers. The railroad. 3 I beg to call attention to the railroad. It is not answering its purpose, because engineers and navvies have in great numbers refused to work, and it is plain that they all wish to leave the country. K If the Army winters here, it will just be the same as last year--there will be no road. Two days' rain renders it quite impassable for wheels. We have no hands to make roads, which ought now to be in progress. The French are fully employed in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 166 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 308g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236553853
  • 9781236553850