Pa Ini; His Place in Sanskrit Literature

Pa Ini; His Place in Sanskrit Literature : An Investigation of Some Literary and Chronological Questions Which May Be Settled by a Study of His Work Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ...as I have already observed, is always disposed to stand by Panini, again takes up his defence, and observes, that Pe1_1ini's using the word bkakshya instead of abhyavaluirya need not have been criticised by Katyayana, for there are expressions like ab-bhakslza, "one who eats water," or vriyu-blzalcslza, " one who eats air," which show that the radical b/za/rah is used also in reference to other than solid food." But both instances alleged by Patanjali are conventional terms; they imply a condition of fasting, and derive their citizenship amongst other classical words from a Vaidik expression, as Patanjali himself admits, when, in his introduction to Panini, he speaks of ekapadas, or words, the sense of which can only be established from the context of a Vaidik passage to which they originally belong;" they do not show, therefore, that b/za/rah is applied also to other phrases of the classical language, so as to refer to liquid food. It seems evident, therefore, that in Pz'n_1ini's time, which pre-ceded the classical epoch, blzalrslzya must have been used as a con-vertible term for 6/zojya; while, at Katyayana's period, this rendering became incorrect, and required the substitution of another word. 3. The words and the meanings of words employed by Katya-yana are such as we meet with in the scientific writers of the classical literature: his expressions would not invite any special attention nor call forth any special remark. This cannot be said of the language of Panini. In his Siitras occur a great number of words and meanings of words, which--so far as my own knowledge goes--have become antiquated in the classical literature. I will mention, for instance, pratg/avaszina, eating...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236833317
  • 9781236833310