PT. II. Correspondence and Miscellaneous Papers Relating to the American Revolution; (V. 3) June, 1775-July, 1776. (V. 4) July, 1776-July] 1777. (V. 5) July, 1777-July, 1778. (V. 6) July, 1778-March, 1780. (V. 7) March, Volume 7

PT. II. Correspondence and Miscellaneous Papers Relating to the American Revolution; (V. 3) June, 1775-July, 1776. (V. 4) July, 1776-July] 1777. (V. 5) July, 1777-July, 1778. (V. 6) July, 1778-March, 1780. (V. 7) March, Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...the season for salting provision will be irretiievably lost; and this leads me to a remark, which I could wish never to make, and which is, that the multiplicity of business, in which Congress are engaged, will not let them extend that seasonable and provident care to many matters, which private convenience and public economy indispensably call for, and proves, in my opinion, the evident necessity of committing more of the executive business to small boards or responsible characters, than is practised at present; for I am very well convinced, that, for want of system in the execution of business, and a proper timing of things, our public expenditures are inconceivably greater than they ought to be. Many instances might be given in proof, but I will confine myself to the article of clothing, as we are feelingly reminded of it. This, instead of being ready in the fall for delivery, is then to be provided, or to be drawn from the Lord knows whither; and, after many soldiers have been forced from the field for want of it, is eked out at different periods, as it can be had through the winter, till spring, and in such a piecemeal way, that the soldier, deriving little comfort from it, is hurt both in appearance and pride, while the recruiting service is greatly injured. Were this the result of necessity, not a word would be said; but it is the effect of a divided attention, or overmuch business; for, at the periods of the extreme suffering of the army, we can hear of clothing in different places falling a prey to moths, and canker-worms of a worse kind; and I am much mistaken, too, if the clothing system (if ours can be called a system) does not afford a fruitful field for stockjobbing. It may be asked what remedy I would apply to these evils? In my...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575830
  • 9781236575838