The Oxford History of Britain: The Modern Age v.5

The Oxford History of Britain: The Modern Age v.5

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Description

In five paperback volumes, "The Oxford History of Britain" tells the story of Britain and her peoples over 2000 years, from the coming of the Roman legions in 55 BC to the present day. This volume concentrates on Britain in the modern age. The later 19th and early 20th century moved on rapidly from the bland self-assurance of the great Exhibition, to the anxieties of the fin de siecle with its social tensions, imperialist neuroses and sense of national vulnerability. The years since 1914 saw two world wars, puvlerizing economic pressure in the '30s and '70s and a forcible wrenching of Britain out of its place in the sun. The story is brought up to date with a description of the Thatcher years and her fall from office.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 184 pages
  • 120 x 190 x 14mm | 149g
  • Oxford University Press
  • Oxford Paperbacks
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 3 maps, 1 genealogical table
  • 0192852671
  • 9780192852670

Table of contents

Part 1 The liberal age (1851-1914), H.C.G. Matthew: free trade - an industrial economy rampant; a shifting population - town and country; the masses and the classes - the urban worker; clerks and commerce - the lower middle class; the propertied classes; pomp and circumstance; "a great change in manners"; "villa Tories" - the Conservative resurgence; Ireland, Scotland, Wales - Home Rule frustrated; reluctant imperialists?; the fin-de-siecle reaction - new views of the state; old liberalism, new liberalism, labourism and tariff reform; Edwardian years - a crisis of the state contained; "your English summer's done". Part 2 The 20th century (1914-1987), Kenneth O. Morgan: World War I; the '20s; the '30s; World War II; the post-war world; the '70 and '80s - the triumph of "Thatcherism".show more