Outlines of Geologic History, with Especial Reference to North America; A Series of Essays Involving a Discussion of Geologic Correlation Presented Before Section E of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Baltimore,

Outlines of Geologic History, with Especial Reference to North America; A Series of Essays Involving a Discussion of Geologic Correlation Presented Before Section E of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Baltimore,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...Measures, in which it occurs with a fauna similar to that sketched above. Dawson regarded the sediments and faunas as representing fresh-water conditions, and considered Naiadites to be related to the Naiads of our fresh-water lakes and rivers. The fresh-water mollusks of the English Carboniferous were included by Dr. Wheelton Hind under the three genera, Anthracoptera, Anthracomya, and Anthrocosia in a valuable monograph published a few years ago. Later, after studying specimens of Naiadites from Nova Scotia, he reached the conclusion that Anthracoptera and Naiadites were the same genus. Thus far the balance of evidence and opinion seems to be in favor of the fresh-water habitat of the fauna. On the other hand, externally and internally, Naiadites is extremely like the marine genus Myalina, and Dr. Hind has referred many of our marine Myalinas to Naiadites. In fact, he has even placed the names of some of our American Myalinas which always occur associated with marine faunas in the synonymy of English species of Naiadites which are supposed to be strictly fresh water. Furthermore, the fauna under consideration is in some instances associated with specimens of Lingula and Aviculipecten. The living Lingulas sometimes inhabit brackish waters near the mouths of rivers, but never the fresh waters of lakes and streams, while the living Peclinoids are strictly marine. The fossil Pectinoids in question are small and depauperate examples and belong to a rather peculiar group, that of Aviculipecten whitei. This assemblage can hardly be explained as due to the accidental commingling of types having different habitats. If it consisted of fresh-water animals washed out to sea we would expect to find the fresh-water types few and the marine ones numerous, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 90 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 177g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236509471
  • 9781236509475