Outdoor Life and Indian Stories; Making Open Air Life Attractive to Young Americans by Telling Them All about Woodcraft, Signs and Signaling, the Stars, Fishing, Camping ...

Outdoor Life and Indian Stories; Making Open Air Life Attractive to Young Americans by Telling Them All about Woodcraft, Signs and Signaling, the Stars, Fishing, Camping ... : Also Stories of Noted Hunters and Scouts, Great Indians and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912* edition. Excerpt: ...Fort George, had placed the ironed prisoners in their wretched quarters, and treated them with brutality. The continued confinement of the hostages enraged the Indians who laid siege to Fort George. It did not take Great Warrior long to learn he could make no impression on it, and he gave up his design for another, more subtle one. He hid a number of his bucks in a dense cane-brake at the river side, and sent a squaw, who was well known at the garrison, to the captain, with a request that he would come to the water where the chief was waiting to tell him important news. Captain Coitmore was rash enough to accept the invitation and went to the place named with two of his officers as companions. H e soon saw Great Warrior standing on the other side of the Savannah, with a bridle in his hand. This was to give color to his statement that he was going to Charleston to secure the release of the Cherokees held as hostages. As the distance was great, he hoped to be able to obtain a horse. WILLIAM PENN TREATING WITH THE INDIANS As he said this, the chief turned about and swung the bridle over his head. The act was the signal to his hidden men, who instantly fired at the three officers. The captain was killed and his companions wounded. The garrison immediately started to put all the hostages in irons, they having been released a short time before. They resisted fiercely, killing one of the soldiers and wounding several. The prisoners expected their comrades outside to come to their help, but that was beyond their power, and the troops completed their crime by putting every one of the imprisoned hostages remorselessly to death. By a strange fatality the victims were related to nearly all the principal families among the Cherokees, who were driven...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236968107
  • 9781236968104