Our Lost or Stolen Political Economic System

Our Lost or Stolen Political Economic System : We Are Left with a Greed Powered Utopia for a Few

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Description

Political economics is what makes a society tick. The process has been under constant development since the beginning of history and is based on humans working as an organized team rather than a group of individuals. Unfortunately, our current misunderstanding of the subject has allowed people driven by greed to grow power through wealth and thus generate an inequality of opportunity. In Our Lost or Stolen Political Economic System, author Charles B. Parker discusses how the quality of opportunity coupled with individual initiative is-or at least was-the hallmark of the American political economic system and basis of the American dream. Using plain language, Parker discusses the system that was lost-or stolen-and offers suggestions on how the citizens of the United States might put things back on track. With chapters titled "Economics and the Constitution," "The Miracle of the Capitalist Monetary System," and "The Tragedy: The Unplanned Consequences of Mind Control," this exceptional resource ties all of the basic elements together to provide a clear view of the different issues, theories, and beliefs that surround this complex and vitally important topic.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 140 x 216 x 6mm | 141g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1514349167
  • 9781514349168

About Charles B Parker

Charles B. Parker attended Washington State University immediately after World War II-along with a multitude of other returning GIs. He majored in engineering, but with as much history and basic economics as possible. After graduation, he attended professional school and became a doctor of optometry. He left his full-time professional practice in the 1970s to head an agency that studied the health care system and advised Congress on the changes necessary to meet the needs of the American people. They arrived at the decision that health care should be a service rather than then a commodity that is sold in the market, but the political winds went the other direction, and the study was dropped. He later joined with a friend to cofound a national financial service company designed to assist early-stage businesses that were not served well by the Small Business Administration.show more